Ingredients

Omega 3

Omega-3 fats are beneficial in at least three areas of human health: heart disease, inflammatory disease, and development of vision and brain function in babies.
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Folate

Folate helps produce and maintain new cells. Adequate folate intake during the periconceptual period, the time just before and just after a woman becomes pregnant, protects against neural tube defects.
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Niacin

Niacin is used by your body to convert carbohydrates into sugar (glucose), which your body then uses for energy. Niacin is required for cell respiration, helps in the release of energy and metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, proper circulation and healthy skin, functioning of the nervous system, and normal secretion of bile and stomach fluids. It is used in the synthesis of sex hormones, treating schizophrenia and other mental illnesses, and a memory-enhancer.
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Antioxidents

Antioxidents help to counter the detrimental effects of oxygen free radicals, Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the development of several diseases including cancer and heart disease.
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Zinc

Zinc stimulates the activity of approximately 100 enzymes, which are substances that promote biochemical reactions in your body. Zinc supports a healthy immune system, is needed for wound healing, helps maintain your sense of taste and smell, and is needed for DNA synthesis. Zinc also supports normal growth and development during pregnancy, childhood, and adolescence.
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Potassium

Potassium is a mineral that helps the kidneys function normally. It also plays a key role in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle contraction, making it an important nutrient for normal heart, digestive, and muscular function.
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Vitamin E

As an antioxidant, Vitamin E is essential for protecting body tissue from the damage of oxidation by neutralising free radicals in the body that cause tissue and cellular damage. It is important in the formation of red blood cells and also contributes to a healthy circulatory system. Vitamin E is also great for cholesterol as it prevents it from being converted to plaque which thickens the blood vessels and leads to stroke and heart disease
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Dietary Fibre

Dietary fibre, particularly insoluble fibre, increases stool weight and, decreases gut transit time and in so doing, helps to relieve constipation. There is some evidence that dietary fibre, particularly soluble dietary fibre (mainly b-glucans) found in barley and oats, may slow digestion and absorption of carbohydrates and hence lower blood glucose and insulin responses. Resistant starch may also reduce or delay the rise in blood glucose and insulin following a meal by slowing the rate and extent of digestion and absorption of carbohydrates.
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